D2D™ Fish School Event to Focus On 'Consumer Reports' Magazine's Frightening Finding that Imported Shrimp Poses a Bacterial Health Threat to Consumers

The growing health threat posed to unsuspecting American consumers by 90% of the shrimp they are consuming will be addressed head-on at D2D’s second Fish School event taking place on July 23, 2015 from 6:00PM until 7:30PM at 3101 North Roosevelt Boulevard, Key West, FL, adjacent to the IBIS Bay Beach Resort and The Stoned Crab restaurant.

“This Consumer Reports magazine study places a microscope on the disturbing reality of imported shrimp which, unfortunately, is what the vast majority of Americans eat,” said D2D co-founder Tony Osborn. “Through the D2D program and, specifically, our upcoming Fish School event, we aim to both educate our Key West community on the dangers of consuming farmed, imported shrimp and offer a far safer, healthier, and local alternative in Key West Pink Shrimp.”

According to the Consumer Reports article, Americans eat, on average, 4lbs of shrimp per year. However, despite this internal demand for shrimp, 94% of shrimp consumed in the States is imported from poorly regulated and unsanitary international fish farms. As a result, when this imported, farmed shrimp arrives at American ports, it’s often coated with both dangerous bacteria and antibiotics. However, while it’s illegal to import bacteria and antibiotic-infested shrimp, the FDA has the capacity to test only .7% of this shrimp and, as a result, the majority of it enters the American seafood supply chain.

Specifically, the referenced study tested 342 samples of frozen shrimp – 284 raw samples and 58 cooked samples – purchased at large chain supermarkets, big-box stores, and “natural” food stores in 27 cities across the country. The study discovered that 16% of the cooked shrimp and 60% of the raw shrimp contained harmful bacteria such as vibrio, staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, listeria, or salmonella. Even more alarming is that 11 samples contained illegal antibiotics, used by foreign fish farmers to preserve their stock. According to the Consumer Reports article, Americans eat, on average, 4lbs of shrimp per year. However, despite this internal demand for shrimp, 94% of shrimp consumed in the States is imported from poorly regulated and unsanitary international fish farms. As a result, when this imported, farmed shrimp arrives at American ports, it’s often coated with both dangerous bacteria and antibiotics. However, while it’s illegal to import bacteria and antibiotic-infested shrimp, the FDA has the capacity to test only .7% of this shrimp and, as a result, the majority of it enters the American seafood supply chain.

“While the dangers of imported, farmed shrimp is clearly an American problem, it is not one without a solution,” offered Bill Kelly, Executive Director of The Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. “Our local waters are abundant with the freshest and most delicious shrimp in the world – Key West Pink Shrimp. However, our community needs to understand that not all shrimp are created equally and that when you buy local, fresh shrimp, you are assured they are healthy. It’s as simple as that.” 

The July 23rd D2D Fish School event, and the D2D program in general, aims to turn the tide of the American seafood industry in favor of local shrimp and away from mostly unregulated farmed and imported shrimp. “The upcoming Fish School event will be forward-thinking. We will certainly discuss the frightening findings of the recent Consumer Reports study, but we will also discuss what can be done to force the FDA to address this issue legally. As Key Westers, we have a perfect solution: buy local, fresh, and delicious Key West Pink Shrimp that just came off a local shrimp boat,” said D2D co-founder Paul Menta. “What’s more, local restaurant member chefs will be conducting whole shrimp cooking demonstrations that night and attendees can sample the safest and healthiest shrimp in the country, all while enjoying beer, wine, and a Key West sunset. It’s an ideal way to spend an evening.”

For more information, visit keywest.docktodish.comfacebook.com/docktodishkeywest, and twitter.com/d2dfish.